Heart of Oneness

Heart of Oneness

a little book of connection

There is no such thing as "the other".


Our screens and newsfeeds are full of violent images; our world is full of poverty, inequality and injustice. We find it hard to live together, in our families, communities, or in the world at large. At the same time, we are surrounded by the beauty of the natural world, and daily life is full of acts of compassion, kindness, friendship and love. How do we reconcile these differences? What does the universe, with its countless examples of mutuality, have to teach us? Science, religion and our own experience teaches us that the whole of creation is a web of interconnectedness. This book explores the oneness at the heart of existence - and what this means for how we act in the world.


Those of our readers who already know Jennifer Kavanagh’s work will be pleased to see a new publication. This short book is an essay on interconnectedness and is intended in as an antidote to the depressing news we see on our screens every day. She writes: We need to remember that alongside the horrors there exists a parallel reality of compassion, love, daily acts of kindness and selflessness, expressions of what we know in our hearts to be the true: our essential interconnectedness. Most of the ills of the world stem from our departure from this reality. In 10 chapters she explores the political and personal implications of interconnectedness. She describes how when she first volunteered for a homeless project she was sent on a tea run. She was nervous: I walked over to a young man in a sleeping bag and asked if he would like a cup of tea or coffee and whether he took sugar. I found myself forming a relationship with another human being. Instead of passing a bundle in a doorway with embarrassment and guilt, I was doing something, however small, and my preconceptions fell away. It was an epiphany, and I realised in that moment that that bundle in the doorway could have been me. She notes that genetically we are more connected than we realise. Going back only 600 years, the common ancestry of Europeans can be traced to a single individual. Looking beyond the human species, the natural world has numerous examples of mutuality. Indeed, DNA shows that the composition of the human body is remarkably similar to the earth’s crust. Given these connections is it not in order 30 for us to respond to the world and to others with a sense of love and kinship? Going beyond the material to the inner world, Kavanagh notes the commonality of faith expressed by many writers, especially in relation to mystical experience, a fact noted by the Quaker, William Penn in the 17th century: The humble, meek, merciful, just, pious, and devout souls are everywhere of one religion, and when death has taken off the mask they will know one another, though the divers liveries they wear here makes them strangers. She concludes: From religion, in science, and from our own daily experience we can see that separation and division are human distortions. The book is unashamedly partisan. Although the author recognises that there is much in human life and history that emphasises the contrary, our competiveness and tribalism, she wishes us to turn in a different direction. Maybe if enough of us turned the world might become a happier and more generous place. Such an attitude is not unfamiliar in Quaker circles, though the sceptic may say that only a few have ever been convinced. Kavanagh counters this with the observation: The first thing to recognise is that there is no such thing as a small piece of work. . . . . All we can do and are, I believe, asked to do is inform ourselves and to foster love in our hearts and actions. The sentiments expressed in this book are unlikely to surprise universalists though they may appreciate their clear and wellwritten presentation. The ideal audience would be those who have never questioned the divisions of species, religion and nationality which separate us and who might be prepared to look afresh at the values they hold. ~ the Universalist, Dorothy Buglass

I finished the book with a sense of hope. Reading it had strengthened my awareness of all manner of connections: between me and other people, with the natural world and with the Divine. I was reminded that no one of us has to save our planet single-handedly. Through spiritual discernment we can each see the part we have to play, and together we can make a difference. And yes, I felt I received both solace and inspiration from this little book. ~ Lynden Easterbrook, Quaker Voices November 17

“Heart of Oneness is another sublime and profound pearl of spiritual wisdom by Jennifer Kavanagh. Her new book is a gorgeous treatise of practical mysticism, a liberating testimony to the truth and reality of oneness, interconnectedness and personal power amidst the divides, difficulties and traumas of today’s world. Her inspiring personal journey of actions and initiatives to support and liberate others moved me deeply. In her humble, Quakerful manner she quietly models the path of the non-dual wise soul who truly encompasses “only us” and lives oneness from her heart; as simply and naturally as breathing.” ~ Rev Dr Lynne Sedgmore OBE

"A wise and welcome reminder of the mutuality and interconnectedness at the heart of the universe." ~ Richard Rohr, Center for Action and Contemplation

Jennifer Kavanagh
Jennifer Kavanagh Jennifer Kavanagh worked in publishing for nearly thirty years, the last fourteen as an independent literary agent. In the past ten years sh...
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